Message sent from:

Forest School

Children have the opportunity to:

  • look at man-made and natural objects
  • sort objects into categories – e.g. manmade and natural
  • play games e.g. ‘my tree, your tree’
  • recognise and name woodland objects
  • learn about woodland creatures and insects – e.g. observing real spiders’ webs
  • learn about lake wildlife
  • make potions, mud pies and much more
  • build dens
  • go on a treasure hunt


Research has shown that Forest Schools can have a powerful effect on children’s confidence, self-esteem and independence as well as an increase in social and physical skills.

Confidence – children develop their confidence through having the freedom, time and space to learn and demonstrate independence.

Social skills – children gain an increased awareness of the consequences of their actions on peers through team activities such as sharing tools and participating in play.

Communication – language development is prompted by the children’s sensory experiences.

Motivation and concentration -  the woods fascinate children and develop a keenness to participate and the ability to concentrate over longer periods of time.

Physical skills – these improvements can be characterised by the development of physical stamina and children’s development of gross and fine motor skills.

Knowledge and Understanding – the children develop an interest and curiosity in their natural surroundings along with a respect for the environment.

Forest school can also make a wider impact:

New perspectives – forest school gives the teacher an opportunity to observe the children in a very different setting to the classroom and therefore develop a new understanding of each child as an individual.

Ripple effect – children take their experiences home, talk about them to friends and family, which can sometimes lead to families visiting the woods more frequently.


Writing the phonic sounds we have been learning in the soil.


Feeding the ducks on Jacks Lake.


Making magic potions after reading Julia Donaldson's ‘Room on a Broom’.

Hit enter to search